One Way Turkey » Destinations http://www.onewayturkey.com Plan and book your trip with travel tips, destination information and inspiration from One Way Turkey - Istanbul. Mon, 29 Aug 2016 20:14:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.14 Pierre Loti http://www.onewayturkey.com/pierre-loti-2/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/pierre-loti-2/#comments Mon, 16 Nov 2015 20:41:52 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3564 The Historical Pierre Loti Coffeehouse can be reached by climbing (the steps through the cemetery beside Eyup Sultan Mosque). Centuries-old coffeehouse is famous for its magnificent view of the Golden Horn. Until the end of the 19th century it was known as the Rabia Kadin Coffeehouse, but after the French writer Pierre Loti began to ...

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The Historical Pierre Loti Coffeehouse can be reached by climbing (the steps through the cemetery beside Eyup Sultan Mosque). Centuries-old coffeehouse is famous for its magnificent view of the Golden Horn. Until the end of the 19th century it was known as the Rabia Kadin Coffeehouse, but after the French writer Pierre Loti began to visit the coffeehouse frequently, it became known by his name. For years the coffeehouse has been a meeting place for lovers, a place where they can draw a spiritual breathe of peace away from the city.

Loti (1850-1923) was a famous French writer and orientalist. A naval officer, Pierre Loti came to Turkey for the first time in 1876 and stayed one year. He discovered the historical coffeehouse that year. It was not only the beauty of the Golden Horn that drew him there; it was also a married Ottoman woman called Aziyade. The great love between Loti, who was married in France, and Aziyade has been talked about for years until it has become legendary. In his novel, Aziyade, Pierre Loti makes no secret of his romance. The coffeehouse is named for him, as is the hill around it.

Right next to the coffeehouse, to the right of the steps, is a touristic project expropriated in 1997for tourist attraction to the area. Wooden houses in the architectural style of Ottoman Turkey have replaced abandoned houses. The project was completed in the year 2000. The six houses were given the names of nearby districts— “Ayvansaray,” “Sutluce,” “Eyiip,” “Balat,” “Haskdy,” and “Fener”—and opened under the general name “The Turquoise Boutique Hotel.” The hotel compound has 68 rooms, 130 beds. The interior has been decorated with suitable furnishings to create a historical atmosphere.

Visitors are able to wonder comfortably through the gardens of the compound, which have been tastefully landscaped in the garden where there is a wishing well. It is believed that if one looks into the well after praying, he will see the place where the valuable object he has lost can be found. At the entrance of the compound is the grave of Ali Pasha, who fell off his horse. According to rumor, the pasha and the sultan had a misunderstanding and the pasha was dismissed from his duty. However, the sultan restored his honor, but then the pasha fell off his horse and died.

In addition to the Pierre Loti Compound, other historical sights have also been restored in the area. For example, the restoration of a school constructed 250 years ago by Idris-i Bitlisi is an important addition to the preservation of historical architecture.

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Topkapi Palace Quick Guide http://www.onewayturkey.com/topkapi-palace-quick-guide-2/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/topkapi-palace-quick-guide-2/#comments Mon, 16 Nov 2015 20:39:16 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3562 The palace of the sultans is the most comprehensive monument to Ottoman civil architecture. Apart from its architectural and historical interest it contains marvellous collections of porcelains, fabrics, swords, embellished manuscripts and artworks which once belonged to the Sultans. You could easily spend a whole day here. The palace is constructed on the site of ...

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The palace of the sultans is the most comprehensive monument to Ottoman civil architecture. Apart from its architectural and historical interest it contains marvellous collections of porcelains, fabrics, swords, embellished manuscripts and artworks which once belonged to the Sultans. You could easily spend a whole day here. The palace is constructed on the site of the original settlement of Constantinople and is a collection of a number of smaller buildings. Apart from the residence of the sultans, the Topkapi was the seat of the executive and supreme juridical power of the Empire. It also had the best school and was served by the best artisans.

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Istanbul http://www.onewayturkey.com/istanbul-2/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/istanbul-2/#comments Mon, 16 Nov 2015 20:32:17 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3558 Istanbul OverviewIstanbul! This dream city, which “… Just to love a region of yours is worth a whole life….” (The famous Turkish poet, “Yahya Kemal”). Istanbul, a city full of secret beauties embraces its visitors with historical monuments of Roman, Byzantine, Latin and Ottoman era. Hagia Sophia with its serene atmosphere, the magnificent Topkapi Palace, the ...

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Istanbul Overview
Istanbul! This dream city, which “… Just to love a region of yours is worth a whole life….” (The famous Turkish poet, “Yahya Kemal”). Istanbul, a city full of secret beauties embraces its visitors with historical monuments of Roman, Byzantine, Latin and Ottoman era. Hagia Sophia with its serene atmosphere, the magnificent Topkapi Palace, the mystical Maiden’s Tower, and the fabulous Basilica Cistern which all date back as early as 627 B.C. of Roman and Byzantine era.

Istanbul is an different cultural capital of 2700 years of history, which offers proves that people of different religion, language and culture can survive together in peace.  The European Parliament has voiced Istanbul as the “Cultural Capital of 2010″ in Turkey. Undoubtedly Istanbul is a most fascinating city without a rival. It is a treasure full of magnificent and invaluable monuments of 2700 years. Therefore, it has not been easy to make a selection among them.

The capital of cultures, Istanbul has a long glorious history and splendour. This historic city, which has embraced and developed different cultures and religions, was always been given importance and made the capital in ancient times, Byzantine and Ottoman periods.

The story of the foundation of the city is embroided by legend. The city was first established by a Thracian hero, Byzas. He came to the present day Sarayburnu, founded the city and was filled with admiration for its beauty, so he named Chalcedon (present-day Kadıköy) on the Asian shore “the Land of the Blinds”.

Istanbul has never lost any of its magnificence since ancient time and has become a megalopolis with a population as dense as that of Greece. It is also a major port and a center for industry, commerce and tourism as it was in the past.

The city’s glory has always been inspiration for poems and songs. Orhan Veli, in one of his poems, “I’m listening to Istanbul”, listens to the city as if he was listening to the history.

“ I’m listening to Istanbul, my eyes closed / It’s heady with the old lives. / There standing a waterside residence with his gloomy boat-houses / In the wuthering blown over southwest wind I’m listening to Istanbul, my eyes closed. ”

The major monuments in the city, which has had different names as Byzantium, Constantinople, Dersaadet and Istanbul, are especially abound in an area known as the historic peninsula, bounded by the Sea of Marmara, the Bosphorus and the Golden Horn.

Not only the architecture but also the embellishment of the city walls, cisterns, obelisks, churches, mosques, mescits, madrasahs, tombs, baths, imarets, bedesten, the Grand Covered Bazaar, and palaces attract a lot of visitors. Among these monuments the Basilica Cistern, the St. Sophia and Chora Museum, the Süleymaniye and the Sultan Ahmet mosques, and the Topkapi and the Dolmabahçe palaces are the best known ones. Besides them, the Yalis (waterside residences) on both sides of the Bosphorus are also worth seeing because they are fine examples of civil Ottoman architecture.

The Isles, Polonezköy and the Belgrad forest are good places for swimming and relaxation.
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Aegean Coast – Turkey http://www.onewayturkey.com/aegean-coast-turkey-2/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/aegean-coast-turkey-2/#comments Mon, 16 Nov 2015 19:40:51 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3553 The region, bearing the same name as the sea, is in the west of the Anatolian Peninsula. There are eight provinces in the region: Afyon, Aydın, Denizli, Izmir, Kütahya, Manisa, Muğla and Uşak. The country’s third biggest city, Izmir, is in this region. The region shows geographical variety, so it is divided into two parts, ...

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The region, bearing the same name as the sea, is in the west of the Anatolian Peninsula. There are eight provinces in the region: Afyon, Aydın, Denizli, Izmir, Kütahya, Manisa, Muğla and Uşak. The country’s third biggest city, Izmir, is in this region.

The region shows geographical variety, so it is divided into two parts, the coastal and the inland parts. In the coastal part, between the parallel mountain ranges running straight to the sea, are fertile plains and rivers. Bozdağ Moun tain and the Büyük Menderes, the Küçük Menderes and the Gediz rivers are important. Bafa and Marmara lakes are among the big lakes in Turkey. In the coastal part, which has a Mediterranean climate, maquis and olive groves occupy the majority of the land. Cotton, tobacco and grapes are produced. The inland part of the region has cold, wet winters and hot dry summers because of being a threshold to Central Anatolia.

The Aegean and Marmara regions are the most developed regions in Turkey. The major industrial centers are Izmir, which is also the biggest port! in the region, Manisa and Denizli.

The coastline, known as Ionia m history, is a world famous tourist attraction.

Kuşadası, Ephesus, Marmaris, Halicarnassus, Didyma and Dalyan with Pergamun, Pamukkale and Aphrodisias in the inland part of the country, are major touristic places.

Aegean Coast Destinations

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Dolmabahce Palace http://www.onewayturkey.com/marmara-region-turkey/istanbul/dolmabahce-palace-istanbul/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/marmara-region-turkey/istanbul/dolmabahce-palace-istanbul/#comments Sat, 26 Apr 2014 14:05:03 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?p=1638 Until the 17th century the area where the palace is today was one of the bays along the Bosphorus. The legendary sailing vessel, ARGOS on which the Argonauts set off to find the Golden Fleece, anchored here. During the Ottoman period, naval captains would anchor their fleet here; traditional naval ceremonies were held in this ...

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Until the 17th century the area where the palace is today was one of the bays along the Bosphorus. The legendary sailing vessel, ARGOS on which the Argonauts set off to find the Golden Fleece, anchored here. During the Ottoman period, naval captains would anchor their fleet here; traditional naval ceremonies were held in this natural harbor. Beginning of the 17 th century by gradual filling the site became one of the royal gardens along the Bosphorus, thus the name “Dolmabahce,” which means filled garden was invented or accepted. In due time, the area was adorned by kiosks and pleasure houses constructed by various sultans until it took on a palatial appearance and was called “The Beşiktaş Shore Palace.”

During the reign of Sultan Abdulmecit (1839-1861) the wooden and unserviceable Be$ikta$ Shore Palace was torn down in 1843 and the foundation of today’s Dolmabahce Palace was laid in its place. The construction with its surrounding walls was completed in 1856. It is set on an area of more than 110,000m’ and is made up of 16 separate compartments outside the main building. There are a series of work places for various purposes, such as palace stables mills, pharmacies, kitchens, aviaries, glassmakers, spinners, and pastry makers. The Clock Tower and the Crown Prince Apartment, the Hareket Kiosk, in the back garden were added during the time of Abdulhamid II (1876-1909).

Constructed by the best Ottoman architects of the time, Karabet and Nikogos Balyan, the palace is divided into three parts—the Mabeyn-i Humayun (only for men), the Muayede Hall (Ceremony Hall) and the Harem-i Humayun (the harem). The Mabeyn was for State business, the harem for the sultan and his family’s private lives. The Muayede Hall between these two sections was reserved for the sultan’s holiday gatherings with the State’s top dignitaries and for various important State ceremonies.

The whole structure, including the basement, is three floors. In shape, details, and ornamentation the palace has an obvious Western influence, interpreted with skill by Ottoman workmen. However, the palace as a whole is arranged according to traditional Turkish house design. The main outer wall is stone, the inner walls are brick overlaid with wood. Open to modern technology, electricity and central heating were added to the palace in 1910-1912. With 45,000m2 of usable floor space, there are 285 rooms, 46 reception areas, 6 Turkish baths, and 68 toilets. The floors are covered with delicately worked parquet, spread with 4454m2 of carpets, woven originally by palace weavers, later in Hereke.

The most important section in Dolmabahce in function and splendor is the Mabeyn area, where the sultan conducted state affairs. The Melhal Room, across the entrance, the Crystal Stairway leading to the upper floor, the Sufera Room where ambassadors were received and the Red Room where the sultan made his appearance were decorated and furnished in historical magnificence. The Zulvecheyn Room on the upper floor served as a passageway to the private offices of the sultan. This private suite contains a grand Turkish bath with marble brought from Egypt, an office room, and living rooms.

The highest and most splendid place in the palace is the Muayede Room located between the Harem and the royal section. This room encompasses an area of more than 2000m:, with 56 columns and a 36m high dome. Hanging from this dome is a 4.5 ton chandelier made in England. The Muayede Room clearly separates the other sections of the palace. Facilities in the basement took heat from the depths of the pillars and gave heat out to the Muayede Room, creating a warm environment for ceremonies that took place during the cold season. On traditional religious holidays the golden throne was brought here from Topkapi Palace, and the sultan greeted state dignitaries from this throne. Galleries separated ambassadors, the palace orchestra, men and women.

Although the palace was built under Western influence, using European palaces as models, the Harem was designed with the old definite lines of separation. However, unlike Topkapi Palace, the harem is not in a separate building. It is under the same roof, a private, special unit within the whole. The Harem makes up about 213 of the palace space. It is connected by a hall through wooden and iron doors with the Mabeyn and the Muayede Room. The Harem consists of the Mother Queen and the Crown Prince suites, the Blue and Pink Reception Rooms, which were used by Sultans Abdulmecit, Abdulaziz, and Resat, the concubine section, the rooms for the wives of the sultan, and the bedroom and study of Ataturk, the founder of the Republic. Innumerable valuable objects such as rugs, pictures, vases, chandeliers and portraits are some of works of art which are most impressive and intriguing aspects of the Harem.

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Topkapi Palace http://www.onewayturkey.com/marmara-region-turkey/istanbul/topkapi-palace/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/marmara-region-turkey/istanbul/topkapi-palace/#comments Sat, 26 Apr 2014 11:38:46 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?p=1630 After the conquest of Istanbul in 1453 Fatih (the Conqueror) Sultan Mehmet moved the throne of the Ottoman Empire to this city. The first palace he set up was in the middle of the city. The second was built in 1470 and has been called Topkapi Palace since recent history. Topkapi is a classical palace ...

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After the conquest of Istanbul in 1453 Fatih (the Conqueror) Sultan Mehmet moved the throne of the Ottoman Empire to this city. The first palace he set up was in the middle of the city. The second was built in 1470 and has been called Topkapi Palace since recent history. Topkapi is a classical palace as all historical Turkish palaces are. It is made up of three courtyards, one after the other, with various functions, shaded by trees and separated by monumental gates.

Topkapi Palace - Istanbul

Topkapi Palace – Istanbul

During the era it was used as a palace, its functions were very different from other historical palaces. It was not only the residence of the State’s single ruler, but also the center for official State business, the place for the assembly of ministers, for the State Treasury, for the Mint, and the Archives.  The State’s association for higher education and the State University were in the palace.

The Ottoman Empire lasted for 622 years, ruling over a vast area surrounding the Black Sea and the Mediterranean Sea which included the continents of Asia, Africa, and Europe for centuries. The Empire united many nations of different race and religion under its rule. The only other empire in history to encompass so much land for such a long time was the Roman Empire. Thirty-six sultans ruled the Empire, and from the 16th century when the sultan took the title of Caliph, he became the religious leader of the Islamic world as well.

The daily life of Topkapt Palace began at dawn and was bound by great ceremony and strict rules of protocol. Everyone had to conform to establish customs and traditions held for centuries. Protocol of the Western world has been influenced by the rules of this palace.

The main entrance to Topkapi Palace is the Bab-i Humayun, or Imperial Gate. The signature above the gate is of Mahmut II. who was the last ruler occupying the palace. The Imperial Gate opens into the first courtyard, called the Janissary courtyard because this special unit of the Ottoman army used to meet here, until the unit was dissolved in 1826 by Mahmut II. This first courtyard of the palace was a service area, open to the public, in which there was a hospital, a bakery, a cannon foundry, the external treasury section, the mint and a warehouse, as well as dormitories for the servants. Except for the mint, none of the above exists today. The tiled kiosk and the Archeological Museum are in the courtyard. To the left of the entrance stands the church of St. Irini.

At the farther end of the courtyard is the middle gate, the Babii’s-Selam, or Salutation Gate, which opens into the inner part of the palace. At this gate everyone except the sultan had to dismount from his horse; only the sultan could enter on horseback. The gate has towers on either side and was built in the time ofFatih (the Conqueror) in 1524-25. The outer world was closed out by this gate. Above the gate is the signature (The Tugra) of Suleyman the Magnificent, known as the Law-maker, and also an Islamic prayer: “There is no other God but Allah, and Mohammed is his slave and prophet.”

Topkapi Palace - Harem - Istanbul

Topkapi Palace – Harem – Istanbul

The courtyard is a huge area, 130 m. long, 110 m.wide. There is a large and peaceful arcade, with oak trees planted along the way, just as Fatih Sultan had planned. The courtyard is known as the Divan Courtyard” because of the domed rooms in the far corners where imperial councils of state were held. On the first four days of the week the sultan and his high officials gathered here to solve the domestic and foreign problems of the State. During the first years after the conquest of Istanbul, Sultan Mehmet would lead the Council himself. In later years, however, the sultan observed the meetings from his seat behind a grilled window in an adjoining room. All sultans continued this practice.

From the Middle Gate many roads opened to various parts of the courtyard. The transverse road to the left leads to the “Divan”, or Council Room” and the rooms connected to it. When viewing the palace from the Golden Horn, the cone-shaped tower, which is the trade-mark of the palace, overlooks these rooms. To the south of the Divan Tower is the carriage gate which leads to the entrance of the harem.

The largest section to the east contains the ten rooms of the palace kitchens. The cone-shaped chimneys of the kitchens are also trademarks of the palace. Today the kitchens and the palace rooms are used to exhibit the palace’s incomparable collection of Chinese porcelain, the world’s third richest collection after Peking and Dresden. Begun by Beyazit II, increased by Sultans Selim and Suleiman, the collection includes marvelous pieces from the Sung and Yuan dynasty (930-1368) up to the 18th c Ming dynasty.

At the end of the second courtyard comes the Bab-us Saade Gate, the Gate of Felicity. Here we enter the private residence of the sultan, completely closed to the outside. It is the center of the inner palace, the gate into the third courtyard. Although actually built at the time of the Conqueror, the gate was redecorated in the rococo style of the 18th century. On the eve of religious holidays, here at this gate the sultan would appear sitting on his festival throne decorated with gold and emeralds would greet his subjects.

Topkapi Palace - Istanbul

Topkapi Palace – Istanbul

From the Bab-us Saade one enters the “Presentation Room” where the sultan would present himself to ambassadors of foreign countries on their arrival and departure. The sultan’s door of the Presentation Room is a small, eaves structure supported by pillars of ancient marble. The foundation and design are from the time of the Conqueror. The writing above the throne has remained since the year 1596. Within the structure of the third courtyard is the “Enderun-i Humayun” which is the center for imperial administrative, religious, and military education. In the environs of the third courtyard are six large rooms. On the left side of the courtyard is the Mosque of the Agas. In the center of the courtyard is one of the palace libraries constructed in 1719 by Ahmet III. To the right is the “Military Campaign Room” where the boys who were being educated for service at court were trained to accompany the sultan on military expeditions. This is one of the largest rooms in the palace, and today it is used to exhibit the robes of the sultans.

 

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  • Hagia Sophia
  • Topkapi Palace
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Halki seminary http://www.onewayturkey.com/marmara-region-turkey/istanbul/halki-seminary-heybeliada-ruhban-okulu/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/marmara-region-turkey/istanbul/halki-seminary-heybeliada-ruhban-okulu/#comments Sat, 26 Apr 2014 11:18:07 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?p=1626 After the conquest of Istanbul, the Greek Orthodox Patriarch had been declared "Head of the Millet." ("Millet"= the adherents of a particular religious creed within the Ottoman Empire) A theological school for Orthodox religious education was established in 1844 by Patriarch Germanos IV. It was connected to the Monastery of The Holy Trinity.

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After the conquest of Istanbul, the Greek Orthodox Patriarch had been declared “Head of the Millet.” (“Millet”= the adherents of a particular religious creed within the Ottoman Empire) A theological school for Orthodox religious education was established in 1844 by Patriarch Germanos IV. It was connected to the Monastery of The Holy Trinity. 

At the time hundreds of thousands of Greek Orthodox followers within the Ottoman Empire and beyond were in need of well-educated religious leaders with knowledge of modern science and technology. Western religious reformers and cultured religious leaders pushed for the founding of such a school. Thus, the Heybeliada seminary was opened and became an integral part of the Holy Trinity Monastery from 1844 until its closing in 1971. On an isolated hilltop, surrounded by the smell of pine and ocean, far from the noise and confusion of city life, the students practiced in the monastery the lessons they learned theoretically in their classes. There was an incomparably rich library. The students graduated speaking several languages, with refined manners and deep knowledge. Within a short time the seminary had gained world fame and had become a highly-respected educational center. There were approximately 1000 graduates over the years of its existence. Of these graduates, twelve became Patriarchs of Istanbul, two were Patriarchs of Alexandria, three were Patriarchs of Antioch, four became archbishops in Athens, and one became an archbishop in Albania. Of the remaining, 343 became high-ranking priests, 318 became monks, and the others served, or are serving, in various places in the world as esteemed theologians.

As of 1844 the seminary building underwent several additions and repairs. On June 28, 1894 during the worse earthquake to hit Istanbul in 150 years, the building suffered great damage. Because the earthquake struck during the lunchtime, there were no deaths, but the building was damaged beyond repair. Money was collected for a new seminary building from rich Greek merchants in Istanbul by the Skilitsis Stefanovik family, who had the Church of the Holy Trinity in Kadikoy, the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul at the §i$li Greek cemetery, and the St. Stephen Church in Paris.

The architect was Periklis Fotiadis, who lived in Istanbul in the late 19th-early 20th centuries, creating many magnificent buildings. At this time he was only 36 years old. His reference was the Zografyon Greek Lycee in Beyoglu, completed in 1893.

With the approval of Sultan Abdulhamit II, on April 22, 1895, the foundation was laid for a new seminary building. After a short one and a half years the seminary reopened on October 6, 1896. It was made in the shape of the Greek alphabet [?]. The building has a basement and two floors. The main entrance door, the splendid marble stairway, and the columns remind the entrance to an ancient Greek temple. The rich brick decoration on the windows and facade recalls Byzantine construction. The dining room and library are on the bottom floor; classrooms, study halls, the physics and chemistry laboratories, the infirmary, and the dormitories are on the entrance floor. On the second floor is a large auditorium, the rooms of the director and the teachers, the secretary’s office, bedrooms for the live-in teachers, and the dormitories of theology students. The Seminary is under the jurisdiction of the Patriarch of Istanbul.

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Holy Trinity Church http://www.onewayturkey.com/marmara-region-turkey/istanbul/holy-trinity-church-aya-triada-kilisesi-istanbul/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/marmara-region-turkey/istanbul/holy-trinity-church-aya-triada-kilisesi-istanbul/#comments Sat, 26 Apr 2014 10:25:53 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?p=1623 According to written sources and most historians, the monastery of Heybeliada was founded in the 9th century by Patriarch St. Fotios. The monastery was dedicated to the Holy Trinity (Aya Triada) and every year on St. Fotios’s Feast Day, February 6, the founding of the monastery is celebrated. According to a handwritten inscription on the ...

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According to written sources and most historians, the monastery of Heybeliada was founded in the 9th century by Patriarch St. Fotios. The monastery was dedicated to the Holy Trinity (Aya Triada) and every year on St. Fotios’s Feast Day, February 6, the founding of the monastery is celebrated.

According to a handwritten inscription on the bible, which was given by the Empress Katerina Kotnnini to the holy trinity monastery, the name “Ring Island (the Greek name for Heybeliada is “Ring”) Holy Trinity Monastery” is used. During the Byzantine era the monastery was used sometimes as a place of worship and rest, sometimes as a place to exile and imprison royals or high officials. The name of the Holy Trinity on Heybeliada is found in a famous list of churches and monasteries of the 16th century compiled by the head priest of the German Church in Istanbul, Stefanos Gerlach,, which confirms the existence of the monastery after the conquest.

Over many years the church of the monastery has been destroyed and rebuilt. There is a marble inscription in Greek on the right hand wall of today’s church which says that the church was opened on Monday, May 1, 1844 by Patriarch Germanos IV and his eminence Sultan Abdulmecit. The Heybeliada seminary and the church share a united past. Today’s church building, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, was built in 1844, the previous church burned down, leaving nothing behind. The church has three naves, in small basilica shape. The high main building, which rises on five columns, is entered through a narrow narthex (hall) .The iconostasis, the bishop’s throne, and the pulpit are made of wood, probably belonging to the mid 19th century. The moveable icons and the Pantocrater (Jesus Christ) on the church ceiling are striking. There are no frescoes or mosaic icons. The church has no bell tower, therefore the bells being kept in a special place in the garden.

 
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  • Topkapi Palace
  • Blue Mosque
  • Grand Bazaar

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Princes Islands http://www.onewayturkey.com/marmara-region-turkey/istanbul/princes-islands-adalar/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/marmara-region-turkey/istanbul/princes-islands-adalar/#comments Sat, 26 Apr 2014 10:14:16 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?p=1620 There is little information on the Istanbul Islands of Istanbul before the Byzantine era. It is mentioned in the works of some ancient writers of antiquity, such as Thimkus Artemiones, but verified information begins with the Byzantines. The islands began to be settled with the split of the Eastern and Western Roman Empires and the ...

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There is little information on the Istanbul Islands of Istanbul before the Byzantine era. It is mentioned in the works of some ancient writers of antiquity, such as Thimkus Artemiones, but verified information begins with the Byzantines. The islands began to be settled with the split of the Eastern and Western Roman Empires and the spread of Christianity.

Western sources call these islands the “Prince’s Islands.” The name must come from the time of the Eastern Roman Empire when royal individuals were exiled to the islands, to be imprisoned in monasteries. The islands have undoubtedly been the scene of innumerable tragedies. Byzantine historians begin to mention these monasteries in the 8th century. Fishermen who lived on the islands were often attacked by pirates. When the Latins came to Istanbul in 1204, the Venetian Duke Dandola incited the Latins to pillage the islands, but it seems they never attacked. In 1302 the islands were attacked by Egriboz and Girit pirates. The Turks got to the islands from the Byzantine Emperor Manuel Paleologos. A sea battle between Musa Çelebi and the Emperor Manuel took place near Yassi Island in 1412, affecting all the islands.

In 1453, about one and a half months before the conquest of Istanbul, while Mehmet the Conqueror was surrounding the city, Baltaoglu Suleyman Bey conquered the island. Consequently, the monasteries, which had been the scene of so many tragedies, were emptied. Most of the island population emigrated to settlements around Istanbul.

The islands have had many names. In Ottoman times they were called the “Red Islands” because of the red color of the soil, common in Mediterranean climates. Aristoteles referred to them as “The Islands of Kadiköy,” Thomas Allom as “Soul Islands,” the famous historian Hammer as “Saint’s Islands,” Deiher as “Monks’ Islands,” Scarlatos Byzantios as”Happiness Islands,” the Byzantines as “Priest’s Islands,” the Greeks as “Giants’ Islands.” One of the oldest names for the islands is “Jinn Islands.” Some sources call them the “Ring Islands” because of their geographical shape. Westerners call them the “Prince’s Islands.” Another historical name is “Pityusa.” Today they are called as “the Islands”. During the Ottoman era the islands were abandoned to their fate until the middle of the 19th century. After the political reform edict of 1839 which gave foreigners the right to own property, the islands underwent a speedy development. It was the French who first chose them as a summer vacation spot. Turks came later. Another reason why the islands gained importance was the regular ferryboat service to and from Istanbul and Kadikoy which began in 1846. Istanbul’s wealthy minorities and foreigners made the islands a very popular place for summer residences. After this development one of the three townships of Istanbul, the 7th township, became the township of the islands.

The most well-known of the islands are Büyükada, Heybeliada, Kinaliada, and Burgazadasi. (Büyükada, Heybeliada, Burgazada, Kınalıada, Sedef Island, Yassıada, Sivriada, Kaşık Island, Tavşan Island)

They are situated in the Marmara sea across Pendik and Kartal, the towns on Asian side. They can be reached by the ferry boats from Istanbul in 1,30 hours from Kabataş in European 45 minutes from Bostana in Asian side. Instead of cars horse carriages are used for transportation on the islands.

 

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Neve Shalom Synagogue http://www.onewayturkey.com/marmara-region-turkey/istanbul/neve-shalom-synagogue-istanbul/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/marmara-region-turkey/istanbul/neve-shalom-synagogue-istanbul/#comments Sat, 26 Apr 2014 09:53:41 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?p=1616 The synagogue is in Kuledibi of the Beyoglu district on Buyuk Hendek Street. It was constructed as a peaceful oasis by remodeling the gymnasium of a Jewish elementary school. The synagogue was ready for worship in 1938, but, unable to obtain the necessary permission, could not be used. It wasn’t until 1949 that two recent Jewish ...

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The synagogue is in Kuledibi of the Beyoglu district on Buyuk Hendek Street. It was constructed as a peaceful oasis by remodeling the gymnasium of a Jewish elementary school. The synagogue was ready for worship in 1938, but, unable to obtain the necessary permission, could not be used. It wasn’t until 1949 that two recent Jewish graduates of Istanbul Technical University, Elio Ventura and Bernard Motola, prepared the project. In 1951 it was open to worship. The dome carries an eight-ton chandelier; the stain glass for the windows was imported from England; and the marble work is striking. Every year countless weddings, bar-mitzvahs, funeral services, and other significant services are held in Neve Shalom. Among the important incidents of the past 50 years are the “Is’as” ceremonies for head-rabbi Rafael Saban on March 2, 1953, and for head rabbi David Aseo on December 7, 1962. On September 6, 1986 twenty-two Jewish worshiper were murdered by foreign terrorists. On March 1, 1992 two terrorists planned an attack on the synagogue, but were apprehended before damage could be done. Three days before this planned attack, a significant ceremony had been held in Neve Shalom. A prayer service of gratitude was held in the synagogue by the descendents of the Sephardic Jews who, 50 years before, had been welcomed with open arms on Turkish soil when they were expelled from Spain. The prayers were offered to the Turkish people. It is said that the present Neve Shalom is on the spot where the Aragon, the synagogue of the Sephardim Jews who emigrated from Spain in the 15th century, was located.

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  • Hagia Sophia
  • Topkapi Palace
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