One Way Turkey http://www.onewayturkey.com Plan and book your trip with travel tips, destination information and inspiration from One Way Turkey - Istanbul. Fri, 14 Jul 2017 11:25:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.15 Dış Çekim Fotoğraf ve Düğün Fotoğrafçısı http://www.onewayturkey.com/dis-cekim-fotograf-dugun-fotografcisi/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/dis-cekim-fotograf-dugun-fotografcisi/#comments Fri, 14 Jul 2017 11:25:26 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?p=3605 Dış Çekim Fotoğraf ve Düğün Fotoğrafçısı Nedir? dış çekim fotoğraf fiyatları dış çekim istanbul istanbul dış çekim mekanları dış çekim fotoğraf pozları profesyonel fotoğraf çekimi fiyatları dış çekim nişan fotoğrafları dış çekim fotoğraf teknikleri düğün fotoğrafçısı istanbul Dış çekim fotoğraf nedir? Sorusuna bu yazımızda cevap arayacağız. Dış çekim fotoğraf; İstanbul’daki düğün fotoğrafçısı arayışınızda size önderlik ...

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Dış Çekim Fotoğraf

Dış Çekim Fotoğraf

Dış Çekim Fotoğraf ve Düğün Fotoğrafçısı Nedir?

dış çekim fotoğraf fiyatları
dış çekim istanbul
istanbul dış çekim mekanları
dış çekim fotoğraf pozları
profesyonel fotoğraf çekimi fiyatları
dış çekim nişan fotoğrafları
dış çekim fotoğraf teknikleri
düğün fotoğrafçısı istanbul

Dış çekim fotoğraf nedir? Sorusuna bu yazımızda cevap arayacağız. Dış çekim fotoğraf; İstanbul’daki düğün fotoğrafçısı arayışınızda size önderlik edecek anahtar kelimedir. Dış çekim için öncelikle inceleyeceğiniz bir takım düğün fotoğrafçıları olacaktır.

Size tavsiye edeceğimiz firmalar arasında Düğün fotoğrafçısı ve dış çekim İstanbul:  http://sanartmedia.com/dis-cekim-fotograf/ olacaktır. Ayrıca dış çekim fotoğraf fiyatları için: http://sanartmedia.com/dis-cekim-fotograf-fiyatlari/ adresini ziyaret etmenizi öneririz.

 

Bir diğer düğün fotoğrafçı tavsiyemiz ise: http://discekimfotograf.com/ İstanbul’da profesyonel dış çekim fotoğrafçısıdır. Düğün fotoğrafçısı fiyatlarına: http://discekimfotograf.com/dis-cekim-fotograf-fiyatlari/ adresiyle ulaşabilirsiniz.

İstanbulda düğün fotoğrafı mekanları için önerebileceğimiz yerler: Emirhan Korusu, Fenerbahçe Parkı, Atatürk Arboretumu, Boğaz Köprüsü, Galata Kulesi, Kız Kulesi gibi mekanlar olacaktır. Düğün fotoğrafçısı seçerken dikkat etmeniz gereken noktalar; uzman fotoğrafçı kadrosu, albüm fiyatları, fotoğraf çekim ekipmanları, ekip tecrübesi gibi özellikler olmalıdır.

Size tavsiye ettiğimiz bu düğün fotoğrafçılarıyla şu hizmetlerden faydalanabilirsiniz: dış çekim nişan fotoğrafları, dış çekim fotoğraf teknikleri, düğün fotoğrafçısı istanbul, dış çekim fiyatları, dış çekim istanbul, istanbul dış çekim mekanları, dış çekim pozları, profesyonel fotoğraf çekimi fiyatları. Ayrıca Bakırköy – İncirli düğün fotoğrafçısı için dış çekim alanında uzman bu şirketlerle iletişime geçebilirsiniz.

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Pierre Loti http://www.onewayturkey.com/pierre-loti-2/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/pierre-loti-2/#comments Mon, 16 Nov 2015 20:41:52 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3564 The Historical Pierre Loti Coffeehouse can be reached by climbing (the steps through the cemetery beside Eyup Sultan Mosque). Centuries-old coffeehouse is famous for its magnificent view of the Golden Horn. Until the end of the 19th century it was known as the Rabia Kadin Coffeehouse, but after the French writer Pierre Loti began to ...

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The Historical Pierre Loti Coffeehouse can be reached by climbing (the steps through the cemetery beside Eyup Sultan Mosque). Centuries-old coffeehouse is famous for its magnificent view of the Golden Horn. Until the end of the 19th century it was known as the Rabia Kadin Coffeehouse, but after the French writer Pierre Loti began to visit the coffeehouse frequently, it became known by his name. For years the coffeehouse has been a meeting place for lovers, a place where they can draw a spiritual breathe of peace away from the city.

Loti (1850-1923) was a famous French writer and orientalist. A naval officer, Pierre Loti came to Turkey for the first time in 1876 and stayed one year. He discovered the historical coffeehouse that year. It was not only the beauty of the Golden Horn that drew him there; it was also a married Ottoman woman called Aziyade. The great love between Loti, who was married in France, and Aziyade has been talked about for years until it has become legendary. In his novel, Aziyade, Pierre Loti makes no secret of his romance. The coffeehouse is named for him, as is the hill around it.

Right next to the coffeehouse, to the right of the steps, is a touristic project expropriated in 1997for tourist attraction to the area. Wooden houses in the architectural style of Ottoman Turkey have replaced abandoned houses. The project was completed in the year 2000. The six houses were given the names of nearby districts— “Ayvansaray,” “Sutluce,” “Eyiip,” “Balat,” “Haskdy,” and “Fener”—and opened under the general name “The Turquoise Boutique Hotel.” The hotel compound has 68 rooms, 130 beds. The interior has been decorated with suitable furnishings to create a historical atmosphere.

Visitors are able to wonder comfortably through the gardens of the compound, which have been tastefully landscaped in the garden where there is a wishing well. It is believed that if one looks into the well after praying, he will see the place where the valuable object he has lost can be found. At the entrance of the compound is the grave of Ali Pasha, who fell off his horse. According to rumor, the pasha and the sultan had a misunderstanding and the pasha was dismissed from his duty. However, the sultan restored his honor, but then the pasha fell off his horse and died.

In addition to the Pierre Loti Compound, other historical sights have also been restored in the area. For example, the restoration of a school constructed 250 years ago by Idris-i Bitlisi is an important addition to the preservation of historical architecture.

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Topkapi Palace Quick Guide http://www.onewayturkey.com/topkapi-palace-quick-guide-2/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/topkapi-palace-quick-guide-2/#comments Mon, 16 Nov 2015 20:39:16 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3562 The palace of the sultans is the most comprehensive monument to Ottoman civil architecture. Apart from its architectural and historical interest it contains marvellous collections of porcelains, fabrics, swords, embellished manuscripts and artworks which once belonged to the Sultans. You could easily spend a whole day here. The palace is constructed on the site of ...

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The palace of the sultans is the most comprehensive monument to Ottoman civil architecture. Apart from its architectural and historical interest it contains marvellous collections of porcelains, fabrics, swords, embellished manuscripts and artworks which once belonged to the Sultans. You could easily spend a whole day here. The palace is constructed on the site of the original settlement of Constantinople and is a collection of a number of smaller buildings. Apart from the residence of the sultans, the Topkapi was the seat of the executive and supreme juridical power of the Empire. It also had the best school and was served by the best artisans.

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Istanbul http://www.onewayturkey.com/istanbul-2/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/istanbul-2/#comments Mon, 16 Nov 2015 20:32:17 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3558 Istanbul OverviewIstanbul! This dream city, which “… Just to love a region of yours is worth a whole life….” (The famous Turkish poet, “Yahya Kemal”). Istanbul, a city full of secret beauties embraces its visitors with historical monuments of Roman, Byzantine, Latin and Ottoman era. Hagia Sophia with its serene atmosphere, the magnificent Topkapi Palace, the ...

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Istanbul Overview
Istanbul! This dream city, which “… Just to love a region of yours is worth a whole life….” (The famous Turkish poet, “Yahya Kemal”). Istanbul, a city full of secret beauties embraces its visitors with historical monuments of Roman, Byzantine, Latin and Ottoman era. Hagia Sophia with its serene atmosphere, the magnificent Topkapi Palace, the mystical Maiden’s Tower, and the fabulous Basilica Cistern which all date back as early as 627 B.C. of Roman and Byzantine era.

Istanbul is an different cultural capital of 2700 years of history, which offers proves that people of different religion, language and culture can survive together in peace.  The European Parliament has voiced Istanbul as the “Cultural Capital of 2010″ in Turkey. Undoubtedly Istanbul is a most fascinating city without a rival. It is a treasure full of magnificent and invaluable monuments of 2700 years. Therefore, it has not been easy to make a selection among them.

The capital of cultures, Istanbul has a long glorious history and splendour. This historic city, which has embraced and developed different cultures and religions, was always been given importance and made the capital in ancient times, Byzantine and Ottoman periods.

The story of the foundation of the city is embroided by legend. The city was first established by a Thracian hero, Byzas. He came to the present day Sarayburnu, founded the city and was filled with admiration for its beauty, so he named Chalcedon (present-day Kadıköy) on the Asian shore “the Land of the Blinds”.

Istanbul has never lost any of its magnificence since ancient time and has become a megalopolis with a population as dense as that of Greece. It is also a major port and a center for industry, commerce and tourism as it was in the past.

The city’s glory has always been inspiration for poems and songs. Orhan Veli, in one of his poems, “I’m listening to Istanbul”, listens to the city as if he was listening to the history.

“ I’m listening to Istanbul, my eyes closed / It’s heady with the old lives. / There standing a waterside residence with his gloomy boat-houses / In the wuthering blown over southwest wind I’m listening to Istanbul, my eyes closed. ”

The major monuments in the city, which has had different names as Byzantium, Constantinople, Dersaadet and Istanbul, are especially abound in an area known as the historic peninsula, bounded by the Sea of Marmara, the Bosphorus and the Golden Horn.

Not only the architecture but also the embellishment of the city walls, cisterns, obelisks, churches, mosques, mescits, madrasahs, tombs, baths, imarets, bedesten, the Grand Covered Bazaar, and palaces attract a lot of visitors. Among these monuments the Basilica Cistern, the St. Sophia and Chora Museum, the Süleymaniye and the Sultan Ahmet mosques, and the Topkapi and the Dolmabahçe palaces are the best known ones. Besides them, the Yalis (waterside residences) on both sides of the Bosphorus are also worth seeing because they are fine examples of civil Ottoman architecture.

The Isles, Polonezköy and the Belgrad forest are good places for swimming and relaxation.
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Aegean Coast – Turkey http://www.onewayturkey.com/aegean-coast-turkey-2/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/aegean-coast-turkey-2/#comments Mon, 16 Nov 2015 19:40:51 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3553 The region, bearing the same name as the sea, is in the west of the Anatolian Peninsula. There are eight provinces in the region: Afyon, Aydın, Denizli, Izmir, Kütahya, Manisa, Muğla and Uşak. The country’s third biggest city, Izmir, is in this region. The region shows geographical variety, so it is divided into two parts, ...

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The region, bearing the same name as the sea, is in the west of the Anatolian Peninsula. There are eight provinces in the region: Afyon, Aydın, Denizli, Izmir, Kütahya, Manisa, Muğla and Uşak. The country’s third biggest city, Izmir, is in this region.

The region shows geographical variety, so it is divided into two parts, the coastal and the inland parts. In the coastal part, between the parallel mountain ranges running straight to the sea, are fertile plains and rivers. Bozdağ Moun tain and the Büyük Menderes, the Küçük Menderes and the Gediz rivers are important. Bafa and Marmara lakes are among the big lakes in Turkey. In the coastal part, which has a Mediterranean climate, maquis and olive groves occupy the majority of the land. Cotton, tobacco and grapes are produced. The inland part of the region has cold, wet winters and hot dry summers because of being a threshold to Central Anatolia.

The Aegean and Marmara regions are the most developed regions in Turkey. The major industrial centers are Izmir, which is also the biggest port! in the region, Manisa and Denizli.

The coastline, known as Ionia m history, is a world famous tourist attraction.

Kuşadası, Ephesus, Marmaris, Halicarnassus, Didyma and Dalyan with Pergamun, Pamukkale and Aphrodisias in the inland part of the country, are major touristic places.

Aegean Coast Destinations

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6 – The Large Courtyard: Different pieces from different periods http://www.onewayturkey.com/ephesus-article-series/the-large-courtyard-different-pieces-from-different-periods/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/ephesus-article-series/the-large-courtyard-different-pieces-from-different-periods/#comments Wed, 07 Oct 2015 11:52:45 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3545 The fourth gallery space in the Ephesus Museum is the spacious inner courtyard that is the gateway from the Hall of New Finds and Coins to the Hall of Grave Artefacts. Here you will find on exhibit architectural pieces, plastic works, and sarcophagi. At the entrance, to the right, there are three statues and architectural ...

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The fourth gallery space in the Ephesus Museum is the spacious inner courtyard that is the gateway from the Hall of New Finds and Coins to the Hall of Grave Artefacts. Here you will find on exhibit architectural pieces, plastic works, and sarcophagi. At the entrance, to the right, there are three statues and architectural finds on the opposite. Extending on the left of the entrance, in the covered gallery, there are banister plaques, door lintels and a baptism altar. Also in this section is an ambon, or a sermon platform and on the side banister of the stairs, the banister plaque depicting the scene where Abraham is sacrificing his son Ishmael. The plaque possibly be-longed to a synagogue, which is dated back to 6th century A.D. In the center of the courtyard is a sundial from Emperor Caracalla’s Period (212-217 A.D.), found in Ephesus Commerce Agora. Here as in its original place, the Eros statue on two dolphins used to be a fountain adjacent to a pool decorating the courtyard of one of the Terrace Houses. Behind the sundial located in the center are the sarcophagus brought from the Belevi Mauso-leum, the column and the capital, and the griffoon, griffon head and vase that are part of the sculpted decora-tions of the roof.

As you enter further into the courtyard and look up, you will see the reconstruction of the Polyphemous group exhibited with the Pollio Fountain, placed such that visitors would see their first location on the pediment of the temple in the State Agora. In this reconstructed version, the statues in the fountain group are completed to their originals; therefore the mythological scene (see Hall of the Fountain Houses for details) was fully enacted. Be-low the pediment are Ionian, Dorian and Corinthian column capitals found in Ephesus and Seljuk from the Ar-chaic Period (6th and 7th centuries B.C.) to the Byzantian Period.

In the other section reached from the courtyard through a bridge is an unfinished Archaic statue of a naked man found in Pamucak, a kouros. Adjacent is the customs law epitaph of the Asia Province, the capital of which was Ephesus. On this epitaph erected at the Ephesus port in 62 A.D. written are all the customs rules of the prov-ince. However, the epitaph was removed by the Byzantines and taken to the ambon at the center of the Basilica of St. John, Ayasuluk Hill. Below the bridge is a mosaic from a Roman villa, which is visible from both sides. Around the mosaic, reliefs from a heroon on Curetes Street and friezes with weapon ornaments from a victory monument that belongs to the Early Empire Period.

On the wall across the courtyard are ostoteks, i.e., small sarcophagi where ashes of the dead were kept and two sarcophagi and their grave steles. Next to the Grave Hall’s door is the seated sculpture of Ephesus citizen Vedia Phaedrina, who commissioned the East Gymnasion.

Ambon banister panel
6th century A.D., marble, 145×113 cm
This fine-grained marble piece was found in the Karaova farm located between Kusadasi and Soke, and it used to decorate the side of the stairs leading to an ambon. On the triangular panel bordered with plant patterns, Ab-raham is about to sacrifice his son Isaac. Depicted on the left is God’s hand, extended to prevent him.

Statue of Eros on dolphin
Marble, 58x23x78 cm
This statue of white veined, medium-grained marble depicts Eros on a dolphin. The eyes and teeth of the dol-phin were sculpted in detail.

Statue of Eros on dolphin
Marble, 55x24x66 cm
Another identically themed Eros statue is made of white veined medium grained marble. Eros attempts to get support from the dolphin with his left hand while he embraces it with his right. Since the opening on the dol-phin’s mouth allows for the flow of water, the statue is thought to have decorated a fountain. The dolphin’s tail and Eros’s are missing.

Archaistic Ionian capital
4th century B.C., marble, height 33 cm, radius 68 cm
This Ionian and archaistic column capital was excavated from the historic site of Ephesus, on Arcadiane Street. One side is processed less, while the other side has deep lines. The square abacus is decorated with Ionian pat-terns.

Archaic Ionian capital
4th century B.C., marble, height 46.7 cm, diameter 92.5 cm
This column capital, found in the Byzantine aqueduct excavations, was renovated during its second usage in order to render it better suitable for its new place. The series of eggs on the echinus were completely destroyed.

Ionian capital with bull protome
Early 1st century A.D., marble, height 43.5 cm, diameter 56 cm
Bull protomes are placed in between the volutes on either sides of this medium-grained marble capital, found in the North Basilica of the State Agora.

Byzantine capital
6th century A.D., marble, height 45 cm
The basket-shaped blonde marble body of the capital was decorated with bas-relief acanthus leaves. The cor-ners of the abacus have concave surfaces and are decorated with four stylized volutes.

Asian Province customs epitaph
1st century A.D., reused in 6th century, 295×144 cm
This epitaph was found in 1979, during the restoration of the Basilica of St. John, by the narthex. Despite its later use as the base of an ambon, it was probably originally located at the Ephesus port. On the epitaph, de-tailed laws regulating the customs duties of the Asia Province during the Roman Period are written. In effect in 175 through 35 B.C., these laws were expanded and renewed by Emperor Neron in 62 A.D. The epitaph con-taining the regulations for all the cities in the province is titled Asia Province Customs Regulations.

Incomplete Kouros statue
Around 520 B.C., marble, 150x50x40 cm
Many parts are missing of this statue found in Pamucak, by the marble quarries in Belevi. The kouros, i.e., the depiction of a young man, the statue is larger than life. It is known that statues such as this were left untreated in marble quarries and then taken to the cities to be completed by sculptors.

Sundial
3rd century A.D., marble, 103×92 cm
An epitaph is placed on the front side of this semi-circular sundial placed on a square pedestal. The concave inner part is divided into 12 equal parts. The sundial was found in the Ephesus Commerce Agora and the shadow of the metal pointer indicates the time. The front part of the sundial that faces south was rotated accord-ing to the position of the sun changing by the seasons. On the epitaph, it is stated that the sundial is dedicated to Emperor Caracalla (212-217 A.D.) and his mother Julia Domna.

Muses sarcophagus
3rd century A.D., marble, sarcophagus: 108x252x109 cm; lid: 40x252x119 cm
The sarcophagus found on the west of the Vedius Gymnasion has a roof-like lid. Eros figures are placed on the acroterium of the roof. Muses, guardians of the arts and sciences are depicted on the sarcophagus, in the front and on the sides, in columns and arches. On the left is Euterpe with her double flute, next to her is Clio, the muse of history. The female figure in the middle probably depicts the deceased person. The one on her right, it is Muse Calliope with her kitara, and the one with the lyre is Erato. On one side of the sarcophagus are masked theater muses Melpomene and Thalia. On the other side is Urania, the muse of astronomy, holding a globe, and adjacent is Terpischore the muse of dance or another muse who is thought to be Polymnia, the muse of panto-mime. The epitaphs and crucifix figures on the sarcophagus lid indicate that it was also used in Byzantine times.

Belevi sarcophagus
Mid-3rd century B.C., marble, sarcophagus: 120×268 cm, lid: 92×258 cm
This sarcophagus was found in the tomb chamber in the famous Belevi Mausoleum. Even though the owner of the mausoleum, which is one of the biggest Hellenistic examples in Anatolia and one of the first pieces where Corintian columns were used, there is a belief that it may have belonged to Antiochos II, the Seleukos king who died in 246 B.C. in the vicinity of Ephesus. Some believe that it belongs to Lysimachos. On the lid of the sar-cophagus, a frontal scene depicting the deceased lying on a kline is portrayed. On the front face of the piece are depicted the legs of the kline and the table in front of it. The frieze decorating the kline is composed of 11 si-rens grouped into three. In mythology, sirens would accompany a dead person into the world of death, and they are frequently used in depictions on tombs. The marble vase and griffon pieces exhibited next to the sarcopha-gus are composed of the decorations on the pyramidal roof of the mausoleum.

Corinthian column
Mid-3rd century B.C., marble, height 112 cm, diameter 78 cm
This highly well preserved column was brought from the Belevi Monument. One of the first examples of the Corinthian style in Anatolia, the profiled abacus has concave surfaces.

Griffon Statue
Mid-3rd century B.C., marble
The griffon statue is thought to have been at the top of the Belevi Mausoleum.

Gladiator Relief
Late Roman, marble, 60x167x14 cm
The relief depicting two fighting gladiators and an older man is thought to belong to the tomb of a gladiator. The armored and helmeted gladiator in the middle holds a dagger on his right hand and an undistinguishable weapon on his left hand. His name is read as Samnit or Secutorr. The gladiator on the right who is not wearing a helmet holds a three-legged pitchfork. The shorthaired, bearded old man on the far left wears a long tunic. This figure probably characterizes a gladiator’s trainer and his name is written as “doctor.”

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5 – The Temple Of Artemis http://www.onewayturkey.com/ephesus-article-series/5-the-temple-of-artemis/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/ephesus-article-series/5-the-temple-of-artemis/#comments Tue, 06 Oct 2015 20:06:18 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3536 The Temple of Artemis in Ephesus which was one of the 7 wonders of the Antiquity is located at the start of the highway Kuşadası in the district Selçuk. It was found as a result of the efforts, which lasted 7 years, of J.T. Wood, an English railway engineer in 1869- Following Wood, Hogarth resumed ...

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The Temple of Artemis in Ephesus which was one of the 7 wonders of the Antiquity is located at the start of the highway Kuşadası in the district Selçuk. It was found as a result of the efforts, which lasted 7 years, of J.T. Wood, an English railway engineer in 1869- Following Wood, Hogarth resumed the excavations in 1904-5 again in the name of the British Museum. The excavations which were re-launched by the Austrian Archaeological Institute in 1965 are still under way. As a result of these excavations the foundations of the temple were unearthed which was first built with the assistance of Kroisos during the 6th century B.C., the Mycenaean era, the earliest phase of the temple, and set on fire and burnt down in the night when Alexander was born* which, then, was re-built in mid-4th century. During the excavations gifts made of prescious materials such as gold, ivory, amber as brought to the temple from distant lands were recovered.

The excavations revealed that the earliest temple was a peripteros with 4×8 columns and measuring 13×6,5 dating from the mid-8th century B.C. However, it was determined that this was not the earliest structure here and also that the finds dated back to the Mycenaean era. The structure built late 7th century B.C. and called as Temple C was 34.40 ms. This temple was called Hecatompedos (hundred feet). 34.40 ms equaled a length of 100 Ionic feet. The construction materials of the superstructure of Hecatompedos were used in the temple built during the Kroisos era.

In around 560 B.C. the construction of the temple known as Kroisos temple was started. For this structure it was used as large blocks cut from the marble quarries around Belevi as it could get.The architects of this temple were the Samian Theodoros, Metagenes and Khersiphron. As during the constriction the temple area was swampy, wood charcoal were filled in the foundations. The ashes and bones from the remains of victims were also spread in order to avoid the rising of the water. Plinius Historian Naturals also wrote that there were 106 columns in this temple. The columns of the temple covered with figures in relief (Columna Caelata) were very well known. These and a great number of frieze blocks were taken to British Museum during the English excavations. Early the 5th century B.C. an altar of “U” plan was added on the axis of the temple. This temple was set on fire by somebody named Herostratos who wished to make his name immortal in 356 B.C. and thus ruined. The story goes that Alexander the Great was born in the night when this event happened. According to the legend, Artemis could not protect the temple as he was away to help with the birth of Alexander.

The architects of the new building are Paionios, Demetrios and Kheirokrates. In this new temple the reliefed columns of the archaic temple were also used. During this era, because of the elevated sea level it became obligatory to build the temple upon a high” platform to avoid any floods. While there were 8 columns on the western façacle, the number of the columns were 21 on the long sides. The height of the columns, on the other hand, was 18.40 ms. The total number of the columns is assumed to have been 127. Artemision was despoiled by Goths in 263. However, once the Artemisian cult was terminated the real destruction followed after 400. A great part of the materials was used in the construction of the St. John’s Church.

Not many ruins exist as visible today on the site of the temple. The column as visible is 14 ms, being 4 ms shorter than its original was. This column was erected upon the platform of its temple of the 4th century in 1973.

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4 – The Hall of New Finds and Coins: Ephesus and its small but precious finds http://www.onewayturkey.com/ephesus-article-series/4-the-hall-of-new-finds-and-coins-ephesus-and-its-small-but-precious-finds/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/ephesus-article-series/4-the-hall-of-new-finds-and-coins-ephesus-and-its-small-but-precious-finds/#comments Tue, 06 Oct 2015 12:51:45 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3531 The Hall of New Finds and Coins offers interesting finds to detail-loving connoisseurs. The exhibit cases here display one of the best-known pieces of the museum, the Eros head, Eros protecting his rabbit from a dog, the masked Eros statuette from a fountain, two Eros reliefs in a niche and small pieces depicting Eros, the ...

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The Hall of New Finds and Coins offers interesting finds to detail-loving connoisseurs. The exhibit cases here display one of the best-known pieces of the museum, the Eros head, Eros protecting his rabbit from a dog, the masked Eros statuette from a fountain, two Eros reliefs in a niche and small pieces depicting Eros, the god of love. There is also an Eros figure on the bronze wine carafe, i.e., the oinochoe’s handle in front of the wall on the left-hand side of the hall. In the inner section also called the Treasure Hall, examples of Ephesus coins are displayed chronologically. An Eros with dolphin statue, an ivory plaque with an Eros depiction and a golden accessory are also displayed in this section.

DISPLAY CASE OF ÇUKURİÇİ MOUND FINDS: FROM THE OLDEN DAYS OF EPHESUS

Brought together in 2010, in this case exhibited are the latest finds from the Çukuriçi Mound, which shed a light on the oldest settlement in the area. Excavations so far have shown that the initial temporary settlement started circa 8200 B.C., but by the end of 7th millennium B.C. (Late Neolithic / Early Chalcolithic), it was home to permanent accommodation. Ruins of houses with foundations of rock and adobe walls indicate that people settled here permanently. It is known that the next period of settlement in the mound comes 1500 years later, in the 4th century B.C. Uninterrupted until 2500 B.C., settlement ended in the Early Bronze Age.
Great changes prevailed in the Aegean region and Southeast Europe in the Early Bronze Age. As communities ac-quired wealth through mining and trade, what is known as the large Proto-Urban cities began to emerge. In this pe-riod, in the Çukuriçi Mound, many buildings with adobe walls, foundations of large rocks and single or multiple rooms were built. Small finds point out the presence of many special activities in dwelling. In the production of especially important copper objects, it is known that first the mold was cast and then hammered for shaping.
The ceramic pots, spindle whorls, stone weights, lids, pestles, half-processed stone tools and copper needles are dated back to 3000-2600 B.C. The seal and the adjacent single ceramic pot are from 6200-6000 B.C.
The copper and bronze axe are pieces excavated in the 1995 digs. Among the interesting pieces also are the ba-salt axes; obsidian kernel imported from Catkoy, the reconstruction of a reaping hook made of flint stones, ob-sidian and flint stone tools.

Ephesus coins
The museum strives to share with the visitors its rich collection of coins by frequently rotating the pieces on display. As the coins on display signify, until the Roman period, the obverse of Ephesus coins usually feature a bee, the symbol of Ephesus, and the reverse feature the sacred deer of Artemis. In Roman times, the obverse side featured images of the emperor and relatives or their symbols.

Coins are small metal pieces whose weight and metal content are warranted by the government through figures and script on the coin. Herodotos says that the Lydians in Western Anatolia between 640-630 B.C used the first coin. A metallic combination of gold and silver, these oval coins were made of electron. The last king of Lydia, Kroisos (reign 560-546) issued coins of gold and silver, becoming the first person to issue coins of two separate metals. After Lydia, important trade centers such as Ephesus, Miletus, Samos, Kyzikos and Chios issued coins.

The oldest coins of Ephesus found in the foundations of the Temple of Artemis are dated back to 6th century B.C. The obverse sides of these coins are empty and the reverse sides have an anvil.
The oldest scripted coin is an Ephesus electron from 6th century B.C., featuring a deer figure and the script “emi sema” (I am the sign of Phanes). From 6th century B.C. onwards, symbols of cities begin appearing on the coins. In this period, obverse sides of Ephesus coins bear the city’s symbol bee, and the reverse have “quadratum inkusum” (quadrangular indents). Starting with these early coins until Roman times, a deer, the sacred animal of the city’s mother god-dess Artemis, is the unchanging element of Ephesus coins. The bee and deer figures allow for the dating of the coins in a definitive way.

In the Roman period, Ephesus coins have been issued continuously from 43 B.C. until the reign of Emperor Gallianus (253-260 with his father; 260-268 alone). In this period, the obverse side had the portraits of the em-peror of the period and his family while the reverse side had the important buildings, statues or artworks in the city. Starting with the fall of the Roman Empire from 3rd century A.D. on, inflation arose in Ephesus as in the rest of the antique world, and the number of coins increased but the purchasing power declined. In Byzantine Period (5-13 A.D.) as in Late Roman Period, coins are no longer issued in Ephesus, and the city lives on as merely an important religious spot.

Cistophoric treasure

Attributed to “cista mystica” (basket of secrets), a concept of significance in the Dionysos cult, these coins are called basket carriers, i.e. “cistophors.” This cistophoric treasure was found in Tulum Place, the town of Torbalı in Izmir. Entirely made of silver, cistophors were issued in three different weights of tetradrachm, didrachm and drachmae in the Rhodes system. The average weight of these coins is 12.50 grams. Even though the cistophors look and weigh the same and are of the same alloy, they vary in radius. Especially those from earlier times are larger and thin, while those dated back to the late period are smaller and thick. On the obverse of these coins depicted is a serpent coiling out of a “cista mystica” with its lid half-open. On the reverse, an ornate quiver and two serpents with intertwined bodies holding their heads up or facing each other are portrayed. On the reverse, the space on the left side of the cistophor is the first three or four letters of the city or its monogram; and various sym-bols on the space on the right. At times, various monograms, letters and symbols also appear between the coils of the two serpents.

Didrachms weigh half, drachmaes weigh a quarter of the tetradrahms, with a Heracles club on a lion’s hide in a garland of oak leaves on the obverse and a bunch of grapes on a vine leaf on the reverse, where also the city’s monogram or initials and other symbol or letters that vary according to the officer who minted the coin are placed on the space on the left. Didrachms and drachmaes were coined in smaller quantities and most of the surviving examples are from Tralles (Aydın) and Ephesus.

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3 – Hall of Fountain Finds: Monumental statues http://www.onewayturkey.com/ephesus-article-series/3-hall-of-fountain-finds-monumental-statues/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/ephesus-article-series/3-hall-of-fountain-finds-monumental-statues/#comments Tue, 06 Oct 2015 11:57:04 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3526 In the Hall of Fountain Finds, statue groups found in Ephesus decorating three monumental fountains dated to the late 1st century A.D. and early 2nd century are exhibited. The sheer size of the statues communicates the splendor in the public places of the period. Statues found in different places such as Curetes Street, Scholasticia Bath, ...

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In the Hall of Fountain Finds, statue groups found in Ephesus decorating three monumental fountains dated to the late 1st century A.D. and early 2nd century are exhibited. The sheer size of the statues communicates the splendor in the public places of the period. Statues found in different places such as Curetes Street, Scholasticia Bath, and Terrace Houses are also on display.

Water “management” in Ephesus
The presence of monumental fountains is a commonly observed element of Antique cities. In Roman Empire, especially in hot and dry regions such as North Africa and Anatolia, fountains gained more importance, and they were enriched with large pools.

These fountains, usually found on the main streets of the cities, were decorated with columns and statues and they would constitute a source of pride for competing cities with their glory.

Some were commissioned by local governments to honor Roman emperors, while some were commissioned in the name of the wealthy people fi-nancing the aqueducts. The first Roman Emperor Augustus (reign 27 B.C. – 14 A.D.) initiated the water system of Ephesus.

The water was brought to the city with aqueducts from around Kusadasi, Marnas and the Cayster River and distributed to the city through a developed network of terracotta pipes. The water in the fountains was free to the public, also providing coolness to the streets on hot days. Water was gathered in a reservoir and from here, distributed to the fountains, public baths and homes.

Zeus portrait head
1st century A.D., marble, 43 cm
This is a portrayal of Zeus with the eye pupils and the back part are left untouched while the upper broken parts are completed through restoration.

POLLIO FOUNTAIN STATUES: THE ADVENTURES OF ODYSSEUS
The fountain located at the city square built in the name of Emperor Domitian (reign 81-96 A.D.) was adorned by a glorious monument named after Pollio, by his stepson who financed the construction of the state agora and the aqueduct in Marnas. This way, Pollio was honored by permission of the City Council. The Pollio fountain was built between 4-14 A.D. and each of the pieces in the Polyphemos status group within the large semicircu-lar niche of the fountain is exhibited in the hall. On the court, which is another gallery space in the museum, the copies of these statues are displayed in the niche, true to their originals. At the entrance of the hall, in the cen-ter, is the Resting Warrior, the colossal statue of a young man in lying position. To the very left of the entrance is a Zeus head found in the niche of the Domitian (Pollio) Fountain facing the state agora and an Aphrodite torso from the Later Hellenistic Period.

Aphrodite torso
1st century A.D., marble, 73 cm
The statue is missing its head, right arm, left arm from the elbow down and the legs from the knee down. The dress exposing the upper body is gathered below. On the right arm is a snake-shaped bracelet. The finger still visible on the right side of the statue on the dress may have belonged to the statue of the Infant Eros and the Aphrodite torso is a copy of the famous Aphrodite and Eros statue group of the Hellenistic Period.

Resting warrior statue
1st century A.D., marble, 120 cm
The statue portrays a lying warrior. In the statue, the weight of the body is placed on his arm resting on a rock. The warrior is thought to have held a shield in his left hand and a sword on his right hand, and his wavy hair is held back with a hair band. His facial expression is intriguing.

Odysseus and the Polyphemos statue group
1st century B.C., marble
This group of statues enacts the legendary struggle of Odysseus and his friends with the Cyclops giant Poly-phemos: Legend has it that Polyphemos, the Cyclops giant son of the sea of god Poseidon, lives in one of the islands where Odysseus stopped by. Odysseus goes to the giant’s cave and drinks his milk. When Polyphemos comes, he eats Odysseus’s friends, falls asleep and then Odysseus pokes the giant in the eye with a log, blinds him and leaves.

The placement of the pieces in the statue group is true to their original places in the fountain. The pieces that be-long to ten of the figures have been found. This group of statues from the Late Hellenistic Period probably origi-nally decorated the pediment of the temple which is thought to have belonged to Egyptian goddess Isis or Augus-tus. The statues were used for a second time in the niche of the Pollio fountain facing the Domitian Square.

At the center of the group of statues in the museum is the head and left leg of Polyphemos, the surviving pieces. On the left, as in the myth, is Odysseus offering a glass of wine to the giant; the hero’s feet, head and arms are missing. The two warriors on the far left hold out a cup to the giant while carrying a wine bottle. Standing on the right of Polyphemos, other friends of Odysseus are sharpening the club to a point, which they will use to blind the giant. In front of Polyphemos lay two figures whose painful facial expressions stand out.

STATUES OF THE NYMPHAEUM TRAIANI: THE GODS AND EPHESIAN HEROES
One of the most striking fountains of Ephesus is the Nymphaeum Traiani on Curetes Street. The epitaph on it indicates that the two story fountain was commissioned by Claudius Aristion, a high-level provincial officer of Ephesus between 102-114 A.D. for Emperor Trajan.
In the hall, in front of the wall across from the entrance are the façade statues of the Nymphaeum of Traiani. The statues of a reclining Satyr, a dressed Dionysos, a man’s portrait and the city’s legendary founder Androk-lus and his dog, and Aphrodite are in this section. Later, the naked Dionysos and a dressed man’s relief and pieces of columns adorned with vine leaves from the Late Antonius Period (138-161 A.D.) were added.

Dionysos statue
2nd century A.D., marble, 189 cm
The naked statue has many of its pieces missing and the vine stick next to its left leg support the body. The ex-plicit portrayal of the pubic muscles of the longhaired Dionysos covered with bunches of grapes and vine leaves bring to mind the style of the famous Greek sculptor Polycleitus (late 5th century – early 4th century B.C.). The statue may have been a reproduction of a 5th century B.C. model.

Reclining Satyr statue
2nd century A.D., marble, 49 cm
This statue used to decorate the second story of the Nymphaeum Traiani. Multiple pieces of one of the mytho-logical Satyr figures are missing. The realistic portrayal of the Satyr’s body is striking.

Aphrodite statue
2nd century A.D. marble, 126 cm
This statue was found in 1957 during the excavations around the Nymphaeum Traiani and it is thought to de-pict a nymph or Aphrodite. The half-clad figure missing its head and arms is on a low pedestal. The folds be-hind a decoration in the shape of a clamshell make up the sash of a fabric draping the lower part of the statue.

Androklus with his dog statue group
2nd century A.D., marble, 122 cm
Many pieces of the statue depict the founder of Ephesus in 10th century B.C. as a Greek colony, the legendary king Androklus with his dog. The collar on the dog’s neck, which stands next to the king and a tree log, is strik-ingly detailed. According to antiquity writers such as Strabon (63/64 B.C. – 24 A.D.) and Pausanias, following the oracle’s advice, Androklus let a boar and a fish determine where he would start the city in Anatolia. Legend has it that the king and his companions find Ephesus by following a boar that was startled by a spark from the pan as they were cooking fish. The statue is an adaptation of the piece Meleagros sculpted by Skopas circa 340 B.C.

GAIUS LAECANIUS BASSUS FOUNTAIN STATUES: GODS OF THE RIVER AND SEA

According to the excavated epitaph, the Gaius Laecanius Bassus Fountain located in the southwest corner of the state agora was ordered to be built in 80 A.D. by Bassus of the city’s elite. Parts of the fountain have survived, and it is known that the people referred to the fountain as the Water Palace due to its sheer size.
The statues decorating the Gaius Laecanius Bassus fountain are exhibited in the far back corner of the hall. On the inner part are the torsos of three Tritons and a Satyr, women’s statues and an Ephesian Hera on the opposite wall, to the right of which are Aphrodite statues. In the center are marble blocks with backgammon-like games drawn on them.
In the corner on the right, across the hall, portraits and ideal female and male plastic heads excavated from dif-ferent parts of Ephesus are exhibited. The helmeted general’s head and the portrait next to the Hermes bust may have belonged to Lysimachos, the founder of the Hellenistic Period Ephesus.

Lysimachos portrait head
First half of 3rd century B.C., marble, 42 cm
The statue of Lysimachos, one of the generals of Alexander, was found on the Curetes Street. Lysimachos re-built Ephesus in 285 B.C. in the location it is visited today. The general’s hair locks echo the typical artistic style of the Hellenistic Period. His lips are slightly parted and his pupils were left untouched. The calm expres-sion of this statue reminds one of the Lysimachos seen on the coins issued in his first period and evokes the work of Lysippos, one of the famous Hellenistic sculptors.

Ideal female head
1st – 2nd century A.D., marble, 35 cm
This statue was found in the Terrace Houses. A Classical Period copy aiming for ideal beauty rather than real-ism, the piece is made of coarse-grained marble. Her wavy hair parted in the middle is held at the top with a ribbon.

Helmeted general’s portrait head
2nd century A.D., marble, 41 cm
Excavated from the west side of the Scholastikia Public Bath, this head belongs to a general. His hair falls down from underneath his helmet. Only the left side survives and the right side is missing. His hair and beard are depicted in detail.

Nymph statue
2nd century A.D., marble, 165 cm
Nymphs are mythological fairies that live in prairies, forests, mountains and watersides. In this statue depicting a nymph, the breasts are damaged. Many pieces are missing and the legs are completed through restoration. The fairy is in an elegant movement, leaning forward to the left on a round pedestal. The wet and thin fabric on the fairy accentuates the curves of her body.

Aphrodite statue
50-100 A.D., marble, 185 cm
The statue was found near the Laecanius Bassus Fountain, and it is missing certain parts such as the back of its head, front sections of its right and left arms, left foot, and a portion of the right leg. Her weight is placed on the right leg and the upper body leans towards the right. Her combed-back wavy hair frames the forehead in a tri-angular fashion. Aphrodite’s chiton reveals her right shoulder and is belted at the waist with a narrow strip. The cloak on the chiton, i.e. the chimaton, hangs down the waist in long pleads.

Triton statue
69-96 A.D., marble, 100 cm
The head and arms of the statue are missing. Befitting the general depiction of Tritons narrated in mythology as the sons of Poseidon, his legs carrying his fit body are in the form of two fish tails curling to both sides. A wa-ter pipe is thought to have passed through the channel behind the left shoulder.

Game boards
Roman, marble
In Roman Ephesus, many game boards were placed in agoras for the citizens to play games. There were also special game boards in wealthy people’s homes. Findings indicate that the checkers were made of clay. These checkers were found in the city’s agora.

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2 – The Hall of the Terrace Houses: Life at “Home” in Ephesus http://www.onewayturkey.com/ephesus-article-series/2-the-hall-of-the-terrace-houses-life-at-home-in-ephesus/ http://www.onewayturkey.com/ephesus-article-series/2-the-hall-of-the-terrace-houses-life-at-home-in-ephesus/#comments Tue, 06 Oct 2015 11:34:44 +0000 http://www.onewayturkey.com/?page_id=3515 The first exhibit section on the left at the entrance of the museum, exhibited in the Hall of the Terrace Houses, are the artifacts used by the upper class people in the Roman Ephesus in their day-to-day lives and the art ob-jects they displayed in their homes. The competency and variety of these objects and ...

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The first exhibit section on the left at the entrance of the museum, exhibited in the Hall of the Terrace Houses, are the artifacts used by the upper class people in the Roman Ephesus in their day-to-day lives and the art ob-jects they displayed in their homes. The competency and variety of these objects and the fine workmanship make us privy to the glory and advancement of the era as well as the artistic style of the time.

Initially brought together in 1994, this hall has on exhibit small finds (statues, furniture, frescoes, jew-elry and small pieces) that provide ideas about the day-to-day life in the Antique Period excavated from Terrace House 1 and Terrace House 2 of the Ephesus Terrace Houses dug up and restored in the past 40 years, and also contributions to the Museum from Ephesus and the surrounding area, such as medical tools.

The Terrace Houses, residences of wealthy people, are the most beautiful examples of peristyle houses as inspired by the houses in Miletos, Priene, Delos and Rhodes. A court in the center, a reception hall and rooms constituted these houses, where the courts were adorned with statues, the grounds with mosaics, and walls with frescoes.

At the entrance of the hall are a floor plan of Terrace House 2, photographs from excavations and panels narrating the history. The statues of Asclepius, god of medicine, and Hygeia stand adjacent. In the following left-side wall, there are two big exhibit cases. In the first case are medical tools, jewelry, spindle whorls, vases; and in the second are displayed daily objects used in the houses.

In the entrance of the hall, in the center, there is an imitation marble table and a Zeus altar. In the group of smaller exhibit cases adjacent to it is a marble statue of Artemis the Huntress in Archaizing style. The case also exhibits a bronze portrait from the 3rd century A.C., and a bronze table and stool adorned with statuettes of boxer protomes. Next to the group of exhibit cases in the middle is a marble tub found in the Terrace Houses. In the center of the hall stands Trajan’s frieze of ivory, one of the most important pieces of the Museum. This frieze is thought to belong to a piece of furniture or a door lintel and on it depicted are three scenes from Em-peror Trajan’s (reign 98-117 A.C.) Orient expedition.

To the right of the hall entrance, the first piece on the wall is the honorary pedestal for an athlete with victory garlands. Then comes the armored bust of Emperor Marcus Aurelius (reign 161-180). This piece has a special importance as one of the few intact portrait busts present in the museums around the world. Next comes the Priapos statue symbolizing fertility and abundance with its exaggerated phallus. The statuette of God Bes in the adjacent case portrays the Egyptian guardian god that is the symbol of male fertility. In the center of the wall on the right, there is a portrait bust of the poet Menandros (342-291 B.C.) and next to it are portraits of a priest and a priestess from the 3rd century B.C. Then, the armored bust of Emperor Tiberius (reign 14-37) and the portrait of his mother Livia are exhibited with the bronze snake in between them, just as they were found in their original place.

Straight across from the entrance, in the back corner, a room from the Ephesus Terrace Houses was or-ganized in a similar fashion to the original and its architecture was conveyed with the visual aid of the large photograph in the background. In the Socrates Room, named after the Socrates fresco in the corner, the owner of the house is depicted, holding a wine cup. There is a statuette of Artemis the Huntress in the wall niche, a Socrates fresco, and on the left is a fresco portraying a Muse, the fairy of inspiration in Greek mythology.

To the left of the exit of the hall, encased is a 6th century bronze statuette portraying one of the priests of Egyptian God Amon. This piece, most probably brought by an Ephesian tradesman from Egypt, is important in that it reveals the presence of commercial relationships between Egypt and the city of Ephesus.

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